Remote learning takes effect

Plainfield+North+High+School+Attendance+Office+Secretary+Martha+Walker+shows+a+student+how+to+log+in+to+his+new+laptop+for+Remote+Learning+during+material+pickup+on+Tuesday%2C+August+18%2C+2020.

Photo by Tom Hernandez

Plainfield North High School Attendance Office Secretary Martha Walker shows a student how to log in to his new laptop for Remote Learning during material pickup on Tuesday, August 18, 2020.

Nick Pallotto, News Editor

As coronavirus cases in DuPage and Will counties continue to rise, over the summer, in a 4-2 verdict, District 2020 board members voted on July 27 to begin the 2020-2021 school year with remote learning. 

“Last spring District 202 was creating plans for remote learning, “District 202 Director of Community Relations Tom Hernandez said.  “We bought 10,000 laptops for 4th through 12th grades.  6,700 more laptops are coming for Pre-K through 3rd grade.”

Students and parents were unsure as to how successful online learning would be. 

“I think it was very intimidating when all content and the curriculum was moved online, and it was just very scary,” District 202 Director of Digital Learning and Innovation Laura Weed said.

Teachers have had to adapt to teaching with no students in attendance and making sure students are doing what is asked of them through a screen.

“The technical side of it is difficult at times and making sure students understand content is always a challenge, “orientation to business teacher Daniel Redmore said.

For some classes like weight training and strength performance, teachers have had to be creative in order to make classes enjoyable as well as learning experience for students. Strength performance classes have implemented more content preparing their students for life ahead.

“There’s definitely a lot of content this year,” strength performance teacher Joby Bodi said. “I’d like to get more into anatomy. My goal is to give the skills students need for life after high school.” 

 The grading system has also been adjusted. Classwork / homework is worth 40% and assessments / projects are worth 60%. Some students see the new grading system as an opportunity to succeed.

“It works in the students favor because not every student is a good test taker, and it will help them succeed in areas in which they are weak,” senior Lorenzo Pardo said.

On Oct. 13, per a district directive, teachers are required to conduct Zoom classes from their own classrooms.

“In terms of the risk of it, I feel OK coming into the building to teach,” English teacher Kerrin Vance said. “I also feel I am safe at home teaching as well. This is just a step the district is taking to get teachers and students back in the building.”