The Prowler

At issue: High School doesn’t prepare you for college

Caroline Baumker, Editor-In-Chief

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While high school does teach students some important subjects, it does not adequately prepare students for all the rigors of college.

It is true that both high school teachers and college professors help their students when they are confused about something or recommend tutors to them. Compared to high school though, college students are expected to teach themselves more than high school students.

Yes, the professors give lectures that teach their students, but overall, the students are responsible for taking the required notes, reading the textbooks so they know the lesson front to back and ultimately they are now adults who are expected to be able to take care of almost everything. They need to know what is due when, where to look up the dates and assignments with little to no prompting and get it all in on time. There are no exceptions such as IEPs or a 5O4 plan that extends their work time.

In high school homework is a big point, and it is used as a way of enforcing that the students learn the lessons being currently taught. In college outside of maybe a thesis and reading up on textbooks, there is not really much graded homework depending on the class.

Plus, in high school, there is the fact that when a student is failing a class, the teacher will contact the student’s parents or guardians. Additionally, guidance counselors check in on students more often. As for missed assignments, while the opportunity to make them up is available, they can be set at inopportune times or in multiple forms such as writing an essay or performing an oral presentation.

While high school covers a large variety of subjects that are useful to know, not all of it is relevant to all majors or careers. While math is important, a psychology major is not going to be doing geometry every day, and someone studying to become an engineer isn’t going to be analyzing the meaning behind literature passages in the long run.

On the other hand, a computer programmer is going to need to have, at the very least, a bachelor’s degree in computer science, information systems or mathematics because they all go together. They are not required to know how to paint or know what year Alexander Hamilton died unless they choose to take those classes.

It has nothing to do with what they want to achieve in life.

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The student news site of Plainfield North High School
At issue: High School doesn’t prepare you for college